Check out the world’s first 3D Printed office!

The world’s first 3D Printed office houses the Dubai Future Foundation.
The world’s first 3D Printed office houses the Dubai Future Foundation.

The world’s first 3D printed office, created using a 20-foot-tall 3D printer with a 120-foot-long robotic arm, currently sits in Dubai. In fact, the most populous city in the United Arab Emirates is continuing to emerge as an impressive global and business hub of the Middle East. So it’s not surprising that its leaders have revealed ambitions plans to eventually 3D print about 25% of the city’s buildings by the year 2030. As proof of its intent, the Municipality of Dubai will soon draft legislation and codes for the use of 3D printing in the construction of all of its future buildings.

Never mind that 3D Printed buildings can reduce and sometimes even eliminate many traditional construction costs, time, labour and waste. Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and ruler of Dubai, was responsible for launching Dubai’s initial 3D Printing strategy earlier this year, that will focus on technological advancements in construction, medical products and consumer products, among others. He has over one million followers on Twitter, making him the most followed Arab politician on that platform.

Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum.
Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum.

“The future will depend on 3D printing technologies in all aspects of our life, starting from houses we live in, the streets we use, the cars we drive, the clothes we wear and the food we eat,” he predicted, explaining the city’s dedicated adoption of new, sustainable construction technologies.

Houses of the future

Futurists have predicted that smaller, more self-sufficient houses are poised to re-define how we live. In doing so, they also predict that 3D printed “slot-together” properties will emerge that will alter forever our traditional ideas of brick-and-mortar homes. Future houses, say experts, will be smaller, operate more efficiently and will be prefabricated, actually sharing similarities to that of houses made from lego. The main focus will be on devices that allow houses to run independently as homeowners will no longer rely on electricity, or gas, but instead use embedded solar panels and home batteries.

 

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Tony Curcio is the editor of Graphic Arts Magazine.