How much would you spend to get the best employees? 

Do you remember how important it was when you were younger to get help, advice and direction from others as you pursued your career? I’m talking about mentors and friends who were always willing to share their experiences, and always seemed to be there to help you out – especially when times were tough.

In my decades in this crazy business, it’s been my pleasure to work with so many kind individuals and generous companies. If you want proof, just visit the Canadian Printing Industries Scholarship Trust Fund (CPISTF) website at www.printscholarships.ca and check out our current 30-plus donors who, for the 2016/2017 academic year, provided over $50,000 in Scholarship funding to students so they can begin or continue towards a career in our wonderful industry. One of our most important objectives, of course, is to continuously add new companies to this list, while keeping our existing donors.

Invest in their future – and you invest in yours!

Folks, we have an ongoing recruiting problem in this industry and we’re trying to help solve it with these initiatives. But make no mistake – the Fund is working for both students and graphic communication companies alike. For example, did you know that a $1,500 Scholarship carries the donating company’s name with it for the entire academic year? Moreover, your company will get first crack at offering these hard-working students a permanent job.

In the past, the most successful companies have stayed in touch with these young people during their educational journey, and reaped the rewards down the road by hiring the best talent. Also, your donation is tax-deductible. This is definitely a win-win situation. But smaller donations are just as critical to the Fund’s success. Personally, I prefer to look at donations as an investment in your own future – a way to attract the best talent. If you feel the same, then please get involved.

Third-year student Daniel Langsford in the Graphic Communications Management (GCM) program at Ryerson University said it best: “I would like to personally thank you for the support you have provided with regards to my education and future in the printing industry. The support provided the necessary motivation to continue progressing and improving my educational status, thus making me a better student.”

When I attended Ryerson’s GCM Annual Awards Night last November in downtown Toronto, I was both inspired and proud – inspired by the student winners, and proud of the leaders in the Canadian printing industry, who, time and time again, step up to the plate as sponsors. Who, year-in, year-out, keep in touch with these young people, constantly build relationships, and stay involved in our industry in so many positive ways.

These young people are our future, my friends. To become a sponsor or to make a tax-deductible contribution, please contact Bob Kirk, Canadian Printing Industries Scholarship Trust Fund, 11 Alderbrook Place, Bolton, Ontario L7E 1V3. Or, you can call Bob at (416) 524-1954, or e-mail him at rkirk@printscholarships.ca. Or, you can visit www.printscholarships.ca.

About the CPISTF

The Canadian Printing Industries Scholarship Trust Fund (CPISTF) was founded in 1971 by the Canadian Printing Industries Association (CPIA), through the efforts of a group of visionary printing industry executives. The Fund’s primary objective is to attract the most talented young people available to the printing industry by providing financial assistance to them while they’re enrolled in an approved graphic arts management or technical program. Many students end up being employed by either the industry executive who interviewed them, as part of the qualification process, or by one of the firms that made a donation to the Fund. Many also gained summer employment.

While the value of each annual scholarship is $1,500, students exhibiting a high level of academic achievement may be considered for the Warren Wilkins Prestige Scholarship with a value of $5,000. This year we awarded just such a scholarship to Rebecca Bourgeois of Ryerson University’s GCM program.

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