Tony Curcio is the editor of Graphic Arts Magazine.

For the record: Don Gain

I recently chatted with Donald N. Gain, President of Harmony Printing in Etobicoke, Ontario who has seen a lot evolve in his more than four decades in this industry.

You purchased Harmony Printing in 1988 and have guided it from a small shop to one of the most successful and respected mid-sized printers in the industry. What were some of the key turning points?

Grafik’Art review

The Grafik’Art Show April 14–16 at Place Bonaventure in Montreal attracted about 6,000 visitors who walked its 120,000 square feet of floor space exploring 87 booths – compared to 82 exhibitors in 2009. There was everything from small specialty printers to large press and pre-press equipment to finishing to sales and marketing solutions. However, as with all similar shows I’ve attended, I was impressed not only with the high level of technology, but even more so with seeing long-established companies survive and thrive in this current troubled ecomomy.

For the record: Richard Armstrong

Richard Armstrong, president of Heidelberg Canada, gives us some valuable insights in this month’s For The Record.

What do you view as your strengths and where do you feel you need to improve?

Our broad product range of equipment and consumables allows us to bundle solutions. This is a strategic advantage for Heidelberg and can be a competitive advantage for our customers.

UV coating vs lamination

UV COATING

UV coating is a process whereby a polymer resin changes from a liquid to a solid with the help of an ultraviolet light source. UV coating can be a direct replacement for lamination and provides a protective covering that adds value to any document, increasing the vibrancy and richness of its colours (as well as protection from scratching and fingerprints). UV coating may be applied as a gloss, semi-gloss, matte, high-gloss, or in some cases with a special roller as a textured finish to many common applications – such as books covers, brochures, menus, postcards and calendars.

For the record: Bob Elliott

With the flat economy still adversely affecting the graphic arts sector, key industry organizations have ramped-up their activities to promote and advance the causes of Canadian printers. I spoke to Bob Elliott, President of the Canadian Printing Industries Association (CPIA), to get an update on what his organization is doing.

For the record: Lawrence Robinson

As well as printing solutions, Agfa is also an industry leader in imaging and proofing systems, consumables and workflow software, to name a few. Which areas does Agfa feel were most successful in 2010 and why?

The year 2010 showed a significant growth and market share gain in offset plates and wide-format inkjet. We’re seeing renewed interest and creativity in the printing industry in many different ways. Commercial printers are finding products that their customers are having success with, so we see interest in our various plates and wide-format printing systems. Additionally, in 2010, for example, Agfa announced the availability of the new :Azura V Chemistry-free Plates for violet systems. The plates are built on technology similar to our market-leading :Azura chemistry-free thermal plates. Commercial printers are looking forward and welcoming the economic challenges.

For the record: Jeff Ekstein

This month, I spoke with Jeff Ekstein who has a unique perspective on the Canadian printing industry. He is President and CEO of Willow Printing Group, headquartered in Concord, Ontario; Co-Chair of CPISC (Canadian Printing Industries Sector Council); Director of CPIA (Canadian Printing Industries Association); and, more recently, Jeff was appointed Secretary of the Printing Industries of America (PIA). And, he has no shortage of opinions on our industry, what we need to do to survive and thrive, and what the immediate future holds.

Folding vs creasing

Creasing versus Scoring

There are several methods of scoring paper or card substrates. However, we will focus on the two most common processes today – rotary scoring and creasing.

The dawn of a new era in print

Business-Building Centre with Breakthrough Services for the Graphic and Printing Industry.

In a previous feature in Graphic Arts Magazine, Dr. Joe Webb, a 30-year veteran of the graphic arts industry, emphasized that “the companies or applications that would have been the ‘old guard’ seem to get into a lot of trouble.

A year in review and looking forward

Here’s a brief month-by-month summary of some of the more notable highlights and lowlights of 2009. In general, print shipments and exports were down each month, often in double digits. But there was some good news too.

JANUARY

• Toronto’s ReproArt went big with HP, installing five new presses. • VistaPrint boasted a revenue increase of 32 per cent over the same second-quarter period last year.

Editorial notebook, November 2009

My first love in the printing industry will always be newspapers. I worked for the Toronto Star as a copywriter from 1969 to 1989 and what a wild and crazy ride it was! In those days, (the ’60s and ’70s) we had insane deadlines several times a day with five separate editions. There would always be “replates” of the first few pages of each edition (the “A” section) as the day’s news rolled in until the “final” home-delivered edition that came out around dinner time.

Editor’s notebook – October 2009

Graphics Canada Trade Show and conference gaining momentum

For more than four decades, Graphics Canada has always been “the show” on the Canadian printing industry landscape. This year is no exception.

Launched 44 years ago, Graphics Canada has not only endured, but it has prevailed, showing amazing resilience especially through difficult economic times.

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