Sign Research Foundation releases updated Wayfinding Manual

SRF’s 2020 Urban Wayfinding Manual.

The Sign Research Foundation (SRF – Washington, DC) has released its latest Urban Wayfinding Planning and Implementation Manual, which has been completely updated with the latest trends and information. The guide was last published in 2013 and wayfinding has only grown in popularity and use since then, said the organization. Urban Wayfinding explores all facets of a wayfinding project, from planning to implementation. It offers tips and strategies on financing, design, regulatory issues and maintenance. It’s also a comprehensive guide that offers support to planners and city officials interested in developing wayfinding programs that enhance a brand and reinforce key destinations. The updated manual includes new case studies that dive deep into how communities have successfully implemented urban wayfinding projects, as well as the new trends that have surfaced over the past 7 years.

The 2020 edition takes a close look at projects in: Vancouver, B.C.; Upper Perkiomen Valley, Philadelphia; Phoenixville, PA; Charlotte, N.C.; Miami Beach, Florida; Los Angeles, California; and Rockville Town Center, MD. Urban Wayfinding also offers insights into funding mechanisms for communities as well as new technologies in use. The low-cost manual is available at the Sign Research Foundation’s website, www.signresearch.org/urban-wayfinding. SRF will unveil the manual at an upcoming webinar, which will dive deeply into the planning aspects of a wayfinding system.

About The Sign Research Foundation. The Sign Research Foundation is the only research organization advancing the science, technology, design, placement and regulation of signs. A proven resource for education, research and philanthropy, its work contributes to more livable cities, thriving businesses and vibrant and effective sign strategies. The organization also facilitates dialogue with architects, urban planners, developers and other constituencies to build stronger, safer and more successful communities.

 

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